CAHC Praises Senate Passage of FDA Reauthorization Act

WASHINGTON, DC (August 3, 2017): The Council for Affordable Health Coverage (CAHC) – a coalition of employers, insurers, brokers, agents, patient groups, and physician organizations – responded today to the overwhelming Senate passage of the FDA Reauthorization Act, legislation renewing FDA user fee agreements (UFAs) for a period of five years. The bill, already passed by the House of Representatives, now heads to the President's desk for his signature. A section-by-section summary of the legislation is available here

CAHC President Joel White released the following statement: 

"The overwhelming House and Senate passage of FDARA stands tall as an example of how, even in today's polarized climate, lawmakers can put politics aside for the good of patients and for the future of medicine. We need more of where this came from in Washington," said CAHC President Joel White. "Enactment of FDARA is vital to a modernized, efficient FDA and lays the groundwork for reforms, like those offered in our Prescriptions for Affordability initiative, that will spur competition among manufacturers, expand access to treatment, and lower costs to consumers. We thank Chairman Walden, Chairman Alexander, and their colleagues for shepherding this legislation through Congress and we urge President Trump to sign the bill without delay." 

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Background:
The Council for Affordable Health Coverage (CAHC) is a broad-based alliance with a primary focus: bringing down the cost of health care for all Americans. CAHC promotes policies that lower health costs through increased competition, informed consumers and more choices to help promote access to affordable coverage. 

CAHC unveiled its Prescriptions for Affordability initiative on May 17th, as reported in PoliticoWashington Examiner, Modern Healthcare, and others. The proposal offers a blueprint for lowering prescription drug costs supported by drug manufacturers, insurers, pharmacy benefit managers, patient advocates, and employer groups.